Two young deer are making a great recovery after being rescued by Burnham-On-Sea firefighters during a brush fire earlier this week.

Burnham-On-Sea.com first reported here, the two fawns were found with burns by crews as they battled to stop a fire spreading in thick brush and undergrowth next to Barton Rd near Webbington, on Monday afternoon (May 13th).

“Two very young fawns were found injured with slight burns but the mother was nowhere to be seen and after taking advice they were taken by the crew to Secret World Wildlife Rescue in East Huntspill,” said a fire spokesman.

Secret World carers have been looking after the fawns – which have been named May and Blossom by the team – and the charity’s founder, Pauline Kidner, says they are making a good recovery.

She told Burnham-On-Sea.com: “A call was received at approximately 5pm of a fire in the open near Crook Peak. When the fire crews attended, the fire was larger than expected and covered approximately 1,000 square feet.”

“As they were using fire beaters to bring the blaze under control, they heard screaming and then saw two fawns, one of which jumped towards one of the fireman’s feet and the other straight into the flames!”

“Firemen Stuart and Kevin Ward carried on with putting out the fire as their first priority. The noise from the fawns was so painful they said no one with a heart could have ignored them so they picked them up and took them back down at around 7.30pm and brought them to Secret World Wildlife Rescue in East Huntspill.”

“The fawns are Roe deer and are newborn with umbilical cords still attached. They both have small burns to their noses and singed fur along their bodies.”

“At Secret World they were assessed and their wounds were treated. They have been called May and Blossom. Despite being so small they have taken milk feeds every three hours and are getting stronger. Their intensive treatment will continue for a few days as they are so young.”

Crews think the fire was started accidentally, most likely from the sun magnified through the glass of a bottle onto the dry gorse.